Oklahoma City Residents Say City Dump Causing Health Problems


Tuesday, March 29th 2011, 9:09 pm
By: News 9


Jennifer Pierce, News 9

OKLAHOMA CITY -- Some Oklahoma City homeowners are raising a stink about a city dump, saying it is making them sick.

The landfill just off I-240 and Bryant Avenue in southeast Oklahoma City is also close to several neighborhoods.

"It's not right for us to have to live this way," said Danny Pinson, who lives near the landfill.

Oklahoma red dirt covers not only the windows, but it's in the cracks and crevices of Pinson's home.

"These houses are plum full of this dirt," Pinson said.

Pinson was recently diagnosed with terminal cancer, and he said he's sure the landfill he can see out his front door is to blame.

"That is contaminated. Everything in there is waste," Pinson said.

Besides that, residents are overwhelmed by the odor.

"It gets so bad, your eyes burn, water, sting," Pinson said.

He said dead animals are dumped there and dump trucks are tracking the waste onto city streets. Pinson said he has reported that to the city, DEQ, EPA, and even circulated a petition around his neighborhood to stop what he calls bad management.

"It's been years I've been fighting this and nothing has happened," Pinson said.

But he said he's not going to give up, even though some people would say just move.

"This is all I got, so you just pick up and move off. I don't think anybody would want to pay me much for this. I wouldn't," Pinson said.

Residents have taken their concerns to their state representative, meeting with them Tuesday, as well as, the DEQ and the City of Oklahoma City. The residents voiced their concerns and talked possible solutions to make their lives a little easier.

Oklahoma City officials said they were not aware of any of the problems residents were having before Tuesday and said as far as they know the landfill is in complete compliance with state and federal law. At the meeting, the DEQ said the landfill has inadequate sprinklers to keep the dust down.

Landfill managers said they now plan to meet monthly with residents about fixing the dirt and odor problems.