Gubernatorial Campaigns Gear Up For Final Push In Week Before Election


Tuesday, October 30th 2018, 7:31 pm
By: Aaron Brilbeck, Bonnie Campo


Gubernatorial candidates are making a last-ditch effort to canvas the state before the November 6 election.

Tuesday, Republican candidate Kevin Stitt’s wife met with voters in Tulsa to share her family’s vision for Oklahoma.

Sarah Stitt said that she hopes Oklahomans see her family as a voice of the people.  She fielded questions concerning education and spoke of Oklahoma's high incarceration rates.

Sarah said in order for Oklahoma to move forward, those issues must be confronted. She also spoke briefly of her own life and overcoming struggle to arrive at where she is now.

“I want people to know, you don't have to be born into a great education, and financial security to make a difference in this world,” Sarah Stitt said.

Matt Pinnell's wife, Lisa Pinnell also attended the event. Matt Pinnell is running as a Republican in the race for Lieutenant Governor.

In a room full of female voters, both families say together they can bring business opportunities to Oklahoma.

Sarah Stitt will be in Oklahoma City tomorrow, October 31, for an early morning meet and greet.

Kevin Stitt will speak in Elk City Tuesday night from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at The Bert Hutson Ranch.

As for gubernatorial Democratic candidate Drew Edmondson, he says the latest financial reports should make voters concerned about how much money Republican candidate Kevin Stitt is loaning his campaign.

Records filed Monday night with the Oklahoma Ethics Commission show Stitt has loaned his campaign a total of nearly $5 million. 

Edmondson, who has loaned his campaign $60,0000, according to Ethics Commission records, says he has concerns about how Stitt will pay himself back.

"I'm proud that he has that kind of money. I'm wondering if he's successful and wins how he plans to go about paying that loan back." Edmondson said. “It’s going to come from special interests.  It's not going to come from hundred-dollar contributions, I don't think.  It's going to come from 2,700 and 5,400 contributors and they're going to want something in return."