Authorities Break Up Large Group On Mini Bikes In Tulsa

Law enforcement officers said 100 people on mini bikes created a disturbance on April 20 that led to troopers and police getting involved.

Monday, April 22nd 2024, 5:46 pm



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Law enforcement officers said 100 people on mini bikes created a disturbance on April 20 that led to troopers and police getting involved.

Dash cam video from the Oklahoma Highway Patrol shows dozens of riders on Tulsa streets and police said it is not only becoming more common, it is also illegal.

Tulsa police said the big ride on April 20 involved different kinds of motorized vehicles.

Officers said the biggest challenge is breaking up crowds of bikes that may be blocking roads and causing safety concerns.

The dash cam video showed crowds of mini bikes and some others riding through Tulsa starting at 31st and Mingo.

Jack Ramsey, one of the riders, said this was a planned event by a group that is often misunderstood.

"This wasn't a takeover,” said Ramsey. “This was just us doing a street ride, and a lot of people showed up.”

Ramsey said no one was trying to break the law when the group stopped at a park near 11th and Mingo because one of the bikes broke down.

"A few newcomers, some people from out of state, as you guys saw,” said Ramsey. “They got scared, and they took off through the creek."

Police said the riders were breaking the law, and officers got involved when some ran into Mingo Creek.

Capt. Richard Meulenberg said police ticketed eight people between the ages of 23 and 44 for operating a motor vehicle off the road on city property.

"We've got someone from Mustang, Claremore, Muskogee,” said Meulenberg. “So, they can probably ride almost any place off-road between Tulsa and where they came from, but they chose to congregate in Tulsa, where they know it's not legal to ride these bikes in the streets."

Ramsey said building and riding mini bikes helps him and many of his friends stay sober.

"A lot of people, they get confused,” said Ramsey. “They think about a moped. This is my hand on the handlebar. This is not a big bike. It's a 49 cc motor scooter that we modified so that can ride them on the streets."

Police said rules are rules, and they have to look out for the safety of everyone sharing the road.

"The big picture is, you have 100 people riding down the street,” said Meulenberg. “They know it's not legal. In what circumstance is it legal to block the street?"

Police said they impounded some of the bikes from Saturday since they cannot be legally used in the city, so the owners would have to pay for the impound and get them towed home.

Police also said to operate a "Motor Scooter" similar to a bicycle, it must not do more than 25 MPH and have an engine no larger than 35 cc.

Police said if it meets this requirement, then all applicable ordinances must be adhered to under City Ordinance Title 37 Chapter 10.

Police said you also cannot operate mini bikes off-road in Tulsa per Title 27 Chapter 18.

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