OKLAHOMA CITY - The State of Oklahoma says a program designed to combat uninsured drivers is working, with people signing up by the thousand.  

However, the roll out of the Oklahoma Uninsured Vehicle Diversion program (UVED) hasn’t been without a few bumps in the road.

The program uses cameras on four state vehicles that scan plates to match them against a database of insured drivers. The program is expanding the use of poll mounted cameras currently being used in Tulsa. They say cameras should be in Oklahoma City in the next 90 days.  

“What we are really trying to do is avoid the ‘gotcha’ moment, where a law enforcement officer rolls up on the back of your car and says, ‘hey, you were speeding and, by the way, you don’t have insurance,’” UVED Prosecutor Amanda Arnall Couch said.

Since last November, of the estimated 41,000 notices sent out to drivers whose license plates were flagged, 12,000 had to be called back due to clerical errors and another 4,000 already had insurance.

UVED Prosecutor Amanda Arnall says the bright spot, of the 25,000 valid notices, nearly 8,000 people have enrolled in the program, paid a fee and promised to keep insurance for at least two years.

“The insurance rates are significantly higher here,” Couch said. “But, in talking to the insurance department, the longer the program goes on and the more people enroll, those rates, premium rates across the state will come down.”

Those caught without insurance receive a letter in the mail with two options. Either prove you have insurance or join the diversionary program. If neither of those happen, you could face a ticket.