President Trump has gained four pounds over the last year but "remains in very good health overall," the White House physician said in a report detailing the results of the president's second annual physical.

Mr. Trump was examined by a teams of specialists over the course of four hours at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday, Dr. Sean Conley wrote in a memo to press secretary Sarah Sanders.

The physical found that Mr. Trump, who is 6'3", weighed in at 243 pounds, an increase of four pounds since his 2018 physical. His height and weight give him a body mass index of 30.4 percent, just over the 30-percent threshold that's considered obese by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Conley made no note of obesity in the memo. 

The president's blood pressure was 118 over 80, typically considered to be in the normal range. Conley said the only change in Mr. Trump's medication an increased dose of rosuvastatin, which helps lower cholesterol. He now takes 40 mg instead of 10 mg.

Routine lab tests found Mr. Trump's kidney, liver and thyroid function are all normal, as are his electrolytes and blood count.

After his first physical in office in 2018, the president was said to be in "excellent health" but agreed he should lose 10 to 15 pounds. Dr. Ronny Jackson, the White House doctor at the time, gave him a strict regimen to follow.

Jackson detailed the results at a White House press briefing, in which impressed he Mr. Trump so much that he was nominated to run the Department of Veterans Affairs. But allegations of misconduct from Jackson's past, including improperly dispensing pills and being drunk on the job, quickly scuttled his nomination. 

Mr. Trump again elevated Jackson earlier in February, nominating him to serve as assistant to the president and chief medical adviser.