Officer Don Hull was in his car just blocks away from the Murrah Federal Building when he heard and felt the blast. He immediately rushed to the scene and started pulling out bodies.

“I remember a lot - most of it I'd like to forget,” said Hull. “You have to understand, I had a history there. I was assigned to DEA for several years. It's personal. It's very personal to me.”

Don pulled little Joseph Webber out of nearly a foot of rubble. And a News 9 photographer was there when it happened. You can see by his expression that Don had no idea if the little boy cradled in his arms would live or die.

“As I picked him up, I don't know whether it was just the movement, shock or whatever, he started to cry,” said Hull.

That cry meant Joseph was alive. And Don says he did everything he could to keep him that way. Don says he kept him tight against his chest to control the bleeding, and to shield Joseph's parents from seeing his injuries.

“I remember turning my back to the Webbers on purpose because I didn't want her to see him this way,” said Hull. “I mean, I pretty much assumed that he wasn't going to make it.”

But then Don got a call that Joseph *did* make it. He even visited the Webbers in the hospital.

The last time Don saw Joseph was a year after the bombing, during a reunion of sorts between the two families. Don's girls playing right alongside the little boy he helped save.

“So I felt much better knowing that at least one that I brought out lived,” remembered Hull.

Years passed, and the kids grew older, but Don always wondered what had become of the precious blonde baby boy he had held so close. And then, 20 years after that tragic day, they got to see each other again. And we were there for the emotional reunion.

Joseph, or Joe as he likes to be called, is now a 21-year-old college student attending OSU. He's studying zoology, but is an artist at heart. His artwork shows his talent of capturing moments in time. But this is a moment in time both this hero and survivor will never forget.

“I'm still trying to take it in,” said Joe Webber at the tearful reunion. “It's cool - now that I actually realize the significance of the day.”

There is still a scar on his cheek, but Joe says he has no memory of what happened that day. And that's something Don is very happy about.

“You were the only good the entire day,” said Hull as he hugged the young man in front of him.

Even now, 20 years later, Hull still can't bring himself to visit the Oklahoma City National Memorial or the Museum. It's still too painful, too raw, the images of what happened that day forever seared in his memory.

The image of that rescue is on display inside the Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum for all to see for years to come.

And now that Joe and Don have finally reunited after all these years, they say they plan to keep in touch. Joe even plans to be at Don's police retirement set for later this year.