95-Year-Old Omega Man Keeps Crop Farming Tradition Alive

Omega’s Gene Hauser has experienced the peaks and valleys of Oklahoma crop farming. His faith and family form the roots of his lifelong tradition.

Thursday, June 13th 2024, 11:01 pm

By: News 9, Jordan Fremstad


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Oklahoma’s wheat rebounded after a difficult drought-plagued last year’s crops. Farmers in Kingfisher County said their crops are healthy. 

Omega’s Gene Hauser has experienced the peaks and valleys of Oklahoma crop farming. His faith and family form the roots of his lifelong tradition. Take a trip down Omega’s East 770 Road and you’ll find people with hearts planted in the ground they own. 

“You just can’t beat something like this where you get to spend time with your family,” said Doug Hauser, Gene Hauser’s son.  

Gene Hauser will challenge anyone to keep up. “He’s giddy when the wheat harvest starts,” Doug Hauser said. 

At 95 years young Gene will share memories that never outgrow his passionate soul. 

“That was in the good times,” said Gene Hauser as he talked about growing up on his Omega farm in the 1930s and 1940s. “I missed World War two by the skin of my teeth.” "I spent four years in the Navy.” 

He traded military service in Korea for a job delivering mail in his community and blossomed on his family farm. 

“These machines they have now are way better than I used to run,” said Gene Hauser, driving his combine. 

His youthful spirit means the world to his son. “It does,” Doug Hauser said. 

The time they share helps them cut their losses at times. “[Farming] is a little bit like gambling also,” Gene Hauser said. 

Last year, Mother Nature neglected their wheat. “It just didn’t rain,” Doug Hauser said. “Last year was a disaster.” 

Last year, the state harvested around 68 million bushels of wheat. Executive Director Mike Schulte with the Oklahoma Wheat Commission said the USDA estimates 98 million bushels this year.  

“I think we’re gonna be a little higher than that when we get this harvest behind us,” Schulte said. 

Schulte said prices are down about $2.00 per bushel compared to last year. However, he said Oklahoma could see yields close to 110 million bushels. That would keep Oklahoma in line with the five-year average. 

“It’s doing really, really well,” Doug Hauser said. 

Gene said farmers must stay humble. He said he can keep tracking forward, “By the grace of God,” because a harvest for Gene is measured, not in bushels, but in memories. His farm is a place where his family grows together. 

“Just a good hard-working man,” Doug Hauser said. “It’s all been good. It’s all been good.” 

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