OKLAHOMA CITY - 6 p.m. update:  The week started with temperatures in the 70s across Oklahoma, and then winter decided to return. Freezing rain, drizzle and sleet fell across much of the KWTV viewing area Tuesday, leading to numerous accidents and school closures.

A travel advisory is in effect through Wednesday night across Oklahoma except far western and southeastern parts of the state. Roads are largely ice covered in central and north-central Oklahoma and slick in spots across western and south-central Oklahoma.

Temperatures will stay in the upper 20s with a breezy north wind Tuesday night and early Wednesday. Speaking of early Wednesday, a wintry mix of precipitation is possible in southern Oklahoma and parts of southeastern Oklahoma.

More wintry precipitation is possible late Wednesday morning and afternoon.

3 p.m. Tuesday update: A band of light freezing drizzle and freezing rain is moving into central Oklahoma Tuesday afternoon, the latest batch of wintry weather to affect the Sooner State.

Precipitation from Enid to Stillwater caused road problems in northern Oklahoma earlier in the day, and freezing rain west of the Oklahoma City metro area turned parts of Interstate 40 in Canadian County into a skating rink.

The Tuesday afternoon band of wintry precipitation is mostly to the south and east of the metro, significantly impacting Moore and Norman. That precipitation will continue to fall through at least 4 p.m. 

***

An Arctic front that brought storms, gusty wind and hail to parts of central Oklahoma is now bringing freezing rain and sleet -- and that is causing road conditions to deteriorate across the Oklahoma City metro area.

KWTV meteorologist Matt Mahler says road temperatures have fallen below freezing, meaning that anything falling will stick. He added that roads are particularly bad as of 10:15 a.m. west of the metro in Canadian County.

Temperatures will stay below freezing throughout the day.

Models don't show precipitation moving out of the area until at least mid-afternoon, if not later.

Take a moment and 'like' our meteorologists on Facebook. They provide you with weather information and analysis day and night. This is a really valuable resource during winter storms of all kinds.

David Payne - click here
Cassie Heiter - click here
Jed Castles - click here
Justin Rudicel - click here
Robyn King - click here
Matt Mahler - click here