OKLAHOMA CITY - Heat waves, droughts, ice storms and tornadoes. Oklahoma sees it all. But are we prepared if mother nature knocks out power or limits our water supply?

We've showed you how Oklahomans are preparing for worst case scenarios, stockpiling food and creating bug out vehicles. Now Oklahomans are gaining self-reliance in a whole new way.

Jay Thurber calls himself a regular suburban man with a plan. He's preparing his family for real life emergencies.

"They're going to be looking to me and I don't want to shrug my shoulders and say let's hide under the bed," Thurber said.

Jay is collecting water, growing some of his own food and storing the essentials in case Oklahoma's weather brings the unexpected.

"We don't want to jump, scrimp and survive for three days," Thurber said. "We want to be comfortable for three days."

Jay and other Oklahomans are preparing for life's disasters at preppers classes like the ones offered at Francis Tuttle Technology Center.

"We're not doomsday preppers, apocalyptic preppers," Instructor David Wiggins said. "We want to actually help you with emergencies and the kinds of things you run into in real life."

Real life skills Jay is applying at his home.

"I don't expect civilization to collapse, the zombies to come out of the woodwork," Thurber said. "I just want to be prepared."

Instructor David Wiggins came up with the idea for the preppers' classes. He said he wanted to pass on some of the emergency skills he's taught boy scouts.

FEMA and the American Red Cross have put together some guidelines on emergency preparedness, with Food and Water in an Emergency and the Are You Ready Guide.