Stillwater Police Hold Q&A Session Regarding Stillwater Homecoming Tragedy


Monday, October 26th 2015, 7:04 pm
By: News 9


Stillwater Police answered questions from the media about details concerning the OSU Homecoming Tragedy.

During the Q&A session with the media, officials answered questions regarding rumors that have surfaced since the crash. They also spoke some about the woman who was behind the wheel of the car that crashed into the crowd, Adacia Chambers.

The following is the transcribed questions and answers:

Q1:  Any truth to whether Chambers was asked to leave her job before the crash because the manager believed she had showed up to work drunk?

A1: These rumors along with Chambers's other activity in the minutes/hours leading up to the incident are being explored as part of the investigation. Any information obtained will most likely be reserved for the case file and not release without the prosecutor’s permission.

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Q2: What are investigators focusing on today?

A2: This week will be consumed with primarily with contacting witnesses.

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Q3: Did Ms. Chambers take a breathalyzer test following the incident?

A3: No.

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Q4: Is there an incident report, or any document outlining what happened?

A4: Copies of incident reports can normally be obtained by submitting an Open Records Request to our Records Unit. All Open record releases must be approved by the City Attorney and the District Attorney where appropriate. This case an on-going investigation and the City Attorney has declined to release copies of the offense report at this time.  Copies of the Probable Cause Affidavit may be obtained from the Payne County Court Clerk’s office.

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Q5a: Was there blood drawn from Ms. Chambers for a toxicology report?

A5a: Yes. Oklahoma law mandates a blood test to test for the presence of intoxicants in the bodies of drivers involved in collisions involving fatalities or serious physical injuries.

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Q5b: If yes, Who conducts the toxicology report, and when can we expect the report to filed?

A5b: Blood samples are sent to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation lab for analysis.