State lawmakers dealt with a lot of policy issues this week, but they learned they’d have less to spend, thanks in part to the coronavirus.

The Board of Equalization met to confirm the state’s $8.2 billion in revenue. Oil and natural gas tax collections are down, in part because of the warm winter, but also because of the coronavirus.

“Really the impacts of that is due to China slowing down their manufacturing facilities as well as quarantining part of their country, which means that their demand for our energy products is lowered,” said Jay Doyle with the Oklahoma Tax Commission.

Dozens of Native Americans rallied at the state Capitol, pushing for legislation to reduce the number of murdered and missing indigenous woman.

“It’s important that we not forget those people that have been missing and murdered, and not only that, we want to bring awareness to those type of things that happened,” said Gov. Reggie Wassana of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes.

A bill to overturn the state’s new permitless carry law died in a House of Representatives committee.

“No, we are not really surprised. Of course, we always had hope that the legislature will vote for common sense gun legislation,” said Cacky Poarch with Moms Demand Action. 

Opponents of permitless carry are planning an initiative petition to have it overturned by a vote of the people.

Oklahoma’s version of stop and frisk was stopped by leadership in the state House of Representatives. A bill to crack down on porch pirates advanced to the floor.

A bill that would allow medical marijuana dispensaries to deliver pot right to your door also advances. It’s kind of like Uber for medical marijuana, or a "doober."

“This would allow a medical marijuana dispensary to offer a home delivery service and the patients would have to go through all the same requirements as if they walked into the store,” said Rep. Scott Fetgatter, R-Assistant Floor Leader.

Next week, lawmakers will discuss imminent domain and whether student athletes should be compensated.