The Most Expensive Cars

 

Do you have a cool 20 million dollars on you? No? That’s how much you’d need to cop the cheapest car on this list.

That car, specifically, was the Bugatti Type 41, which is was almost 90 years old at the time of sale. It’s one of the biggest cars ever made, which may have had something to do with its sale price.

Biggest car or not, when we say cheapest, we’re not talking about budget buys – it was the cheapest of the most expensive cars sold – ever. We’re listing more high-priced cars sold at auction, from least to most costly, below.

The Most Expensive Cars Sold at Auction

Since we already dropped the least expensive car on this list, we’re starting below with #2.

Please note that prices are adjusted for inflation and purchase price history varies by a few hundred to a few thousand dollars between sources.

1. 1939 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Spider – $21,111,686

Coming in at just one million more than our last car, the price tag on this baby is nothing to scoff at.

The 1930’s car is one of the first “sports car” models ever made, and it still manages to look sleek after all this time.

There were only 32 of this specific model made in the 1930’s, so it’s rarity adds to the price.

If you saw it on the road, you’d expect to see black-and-white era movie stars in cat-eye sunglasses with a scarf wrapped around their hair. But, given that it’s a 90 plus-year-old car – you probably won’t.

2. 1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale – $22,888,469

If you’re not someone that understands technical car talk, you might want to skip this entry. It’s a rare Ferarri, with only three ever made.

Part of what makes it so unique is the collaboration of designers and bodywork professionals. Pininfarina designed the car, but the bodywork was put together by Scaglietti.

When it comes to specifics, this car has a 320 HP V12 engine. There are six Weber 38 DCN carburetors, and it has a five-speed stick-shift transmission.

Why did they only make three? We’ll never know.

3. 1955 Jaguar D-Type XKD 501 – $23,222,785

Do you like racecars? While this one doesn’t look like the kind you’ll see in Daytona (or any other modern roadway), it’s a winner. It won the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1956.

It was the first car of its type run in this race, driven by the Ecurie Ecosse racing team.

The Scottish racing team is thought to own the car still, and it’s in almost identical condition to the day it won.

Very few, if any, cars from this model-type are still around, which explains its $23 million price tag.

You can read about this blue beauty and admire how it almost looks like it has a jet engine on its trunk. Maybe that’s what makes it so fast!

4. 1956 Aston Martin DBR1/1 – $24,187,630

The manufacturer “Aston Martin” should make you automatically think of James Bond, but he didn’t drive this particular version.

He could have, though. It’s definitely cool enough. It’s one of only five DBR1’s ever made, and this one happens to be the first.

It’s a race car as well, but it has a more diverse driver history than the Jaguar above. Roy Salvadori, Stirling Moss, Carroll Shelby, and other racers have all sat behind the wheel.

You won’t find it racing today, though. It’s owned and maintained by an “Aston Martin Specialist” named R.S. Williams.

If you ever saw this car as part of any live auctions, you’d need to bet at least double its current price to have a chance at driving it home.

5. 1956 Ferrari 290 MM – $26,381,000

There’s a reason there are more Ferraris than any other car brand on this list. They often make short-production or limited-model releases, and this is one of them.

It’s not as rare as the 275 GTB/C above for production reasons, but it still has a robust profile.

This little red, yellow, and blue car is a star in the Formula One racing world. Who made it famous? None other than the Juan Manuel Fangio, who was the first real Formula One race star.

He didn’t have much luck with this particular car, though. The car is topless, and his race in 1956 was through torrential rains. He placed fourth and walked to the podium very, very, wet.

Before the star sold it in 2015, he gave it a complete engine rebuild. It’s now ready to hit the racetrack all over again!

6. 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO Berlinetta – $38,150,000

Our next car does a significant jump in price, even though it’s not as old or as rare as others on the list.

It is, however, an award-winning racecar (depending on how much credit you give to the driver). It’s gone through the World Sportscar Championship three times and won several Formula One races.

The car is mostly engine, with a very simplistic and lightweight interior. That’s one reason it can go so fast!

The engine is in the front of the car, unlike most modern sport race cars, which reduces its drag.

Though you won’t see it keeping pace in any races today, it’s still worth a whopping 38 million dollars, or more.

It only fits two passengers, so you’re not getting that much bang for your buck.

Buying Cars at Auctions

While you’ll probably never have a cool $30 million to spend on a vintage car, it’s worth seeing them at car shows.

These babies are full of history and are so shiny you can see your reflection.

Cars sold at auctions can be great deals – or they can break the bank. It all depends on which auction you attend.

To learn more about cars and high-price items, click around using the categories above.

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