Whether or not Tony Soprano survived the show's final episode is still up for debate, but now the world knows what happened to his house: It's on the market. The North Caldwell, New Jersey home that was used in "The Sopranos" is being offered for sale at a starting price of $3.4 million, according to the New York Times.

 

The sprawling 5,600-square-foot home sits on about 1.46 acres. Several real estate sites like Zillow and Trulia estimate the home is worth about $1.5 million, based on other properties in the area. However, the homeowners told The Times they'll start the bidding at a much higher price.

The home boasts four bedrooms, 4.5 bathrooms, two two-car garages and separate guest house, according to the Times. "Those things can be quantified," homeowner Victor Recchia, told the paper. "But I don't think you can quantify the intrinsic value of this home."

Recchia and his wife, Patti, are selling the home themselves, and ask that those interested in buying the iconic house submit offers and proof of funds to them by email by June 21 to sopranoshouseforsale@gmail.com.

The hit HBO mobster show ended in 2007, but fans still visit the home frequently. Fan photos on social media, taken at the end of the winding driveway, show orange cones blocking unauthorized cars from driving up to the front of the house. 

It's the same driveway Tony Soprano walked down in his bathrobe to get the newspaper, only later learning that the FBI was parked right outside, waiting for the family to leave so they could bug the house.

When James Gandolfini, who played Tony Soprano, passed away in 2013 at the age of 51, fans paid tribute at the home, CBS New York reports. A candle was placed in front of the house in memory of Gandolfini, who died after suffering a heart attack while in Italy with his family.

"The Sopranos" was filmed all over New Jersey, and most of the scenes inside the famous house were actually shot on a set at Silvercup Studios in Long Island City, New York. But now fans can actually own a piece of the show's history — for a cool $3.4 million or more.