HOLDENVILLE, Oklahoma - A photo posted to Facebook has an Oklahoma prison investigating whether or not an inmate has a cellphone. 

The victim's family says this is the second time they've seen their loved one’s murderer come across on their social media feed.

La'Keysha Moore still breaks into tears trying to describe her sister Demetric.

“She was a loving individual. She was a hard worker,” Moore said.

Moore says her sister was murdered more than 20 years ago by David Young.

Young was sent to the Davis Correctional Facility in Holdenville in 1997 to serve a life sentence.          

“He was locked up before Facebook existed,” Moore said.

However, Moore says Young has popped up on her Facebook feed twice now. The first incident was in 2015.           

“He had a Facebook page somehow of him showing pictures of himself again in prison,” Moore said of the 2015 incident.

Then, Thursday, a different Facebook user posted a possible selfie of Young.

Moore's not sure if it's an old photo, or if Young somehow was able to take a new one.          

“It looks like a pretty up-to-date picture,” Moore said.

Now, the private prison is investigating.

Davis is owned by Core Civic, which directed News 9 to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections for comment.

The DOC sent the following statement:

“They’ve heard from a woman who called the facility upset that he was on Facebook. The facility reports that they have searched Mr. Young and his cell multiple times since the woman contacted them. They have also run him by a cell sense tower (that’s a tower that will flash red when it detects a cellphone signal). They searched him again today after you contacted me, and they have told us they will place him in segregation until he either gives up the phone or tells staff how he may have had access to one.

Having a cellphone inside a prison is a felony in Oklahoma. Our staff (and I’m sure those of CoreCivic and Geo Group) seize thousands of cellphones per year, but we can’t get them all. The FCC continues to prevent us from blocking cellphone signals inside our facilities. If we had that ability, then inmates would not be able to potentially harass or threaten victims by being able to get on social media.”

Moore says something must change.           

“I need something to be done about it as far as prisoners being able to have access to a cell phone,” Moore said.