GUTHRIE, Oklahoma - State budget cuts aren't leaving much room for the upkeep of historical sites across the state.

Now, a metro group is stepping in to help a historic building in Guthrie.

A piece of Oklahoma history is on its way to a new life thanks to a group called Guthrie Tomorrow Coalition.

The State Capitol Publishing Museum was forced to shut its doors after the boiler quit working, leaving it to collect dust for nearly six years.

Before becoming a museum, the building provided a home for the State Capital Publishing Company.

Originally owned by editor Frank Greer, reports say the 115-year-old building served as the only publishing house west of the Mississippi for several years.

The second floor balcony even holds a particularly special place in Oklahoma history.

Guthrie Tomorrow Coalition said they acknowledge the enormous task of restoring the deteriorating building and the real work is only just beginning.

The group said they are taking this project seriously because that's what this piece of state history deserves.

Guthrie Tomorrow Coalition is actually hosting a ceremony for the building's title to be transferred to them.

The title will be transferred onsite June 27, at 301 W. Harrison Avenue, Guthrie. 

The ceremony will coincide with the Guthrie Chamber Coffee at 9:30 a.m.