Gan Matthews, News 9

GRADY COUNTY, Oklahoma -- Large cities rely on lakes for their water, but rural areas depend mainly upon wells. Now, the Oklahoma drought is having an impact upon that resource too.

In Garvin County, the demand for water for both residential use and irrigation has lowered the aquifer down from 17 feet to 15 feet. The Chairman of Rural Water District #1 is calling upon his 600 customers to adopt a voluntary odd/even approach to outdoor watering.

"My concern is that people will overuse it not realizing that it's not an unlimited source," said Garvin County resident Jim Campbell.

Sharon Garrett lives in the Bridgecreek Addition in Grady County. She gets all of her water from her well, and the only outdoor watering she does is for her trees every other day. She said many newcomers to the area, who also use well water, continue to regularly water their lawns.

"My concern is, as that water level drops, we're going to be out of water," Garrett said.

The Bridge Creek Addition sits in an area of Grady County that is not under the jurisdiction of any Rural Water District.