By Amy Lester, NEWS 9

The high winds mean high fire danger for Oklahoma. Now with a burn ban in place, it is even more important to prevent fires, authorities said.

Firefighters said the conditions are dry. That combined with high winds could be a recipe for disaster. 

"We've got to really be on our toes and we're asking the citizens to be on their toes as well to help us combat these grass fires this year," said Oklahoma City Battalion Chief Felton Morgan.

Rarely does Mother Nature spark a grass fire; they're usually caused by people. Oklahoma City Firefighters said the three main culprits are cigarettes thrown from vehicles, trash burning and children playing with fire. All three can lead to deadly situations.

Morgan said if a grassfire does start, tall grass and piles of tree limbs left over from December's ice storm could fuel the fire, creating an epidemic unlike what we've seen before.

"If the citizens and people are not aware it could probably be worst than in the past," Morgan said.

To safeguard your home, make sure tree limbs are at least 30 feet away from your house.  Thin out nearby trees and brush, remove dead leaves, cut down hanging tree limbs and keep the grass short.

Firefighters expect grassfires to be a problem until April or May.