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The Nation's Weather

Associated Press - December 29, 2007 2:03 PM ET

AP-The Nation's Weather DTN/METEORLOGIX MINNEAPOLIS,MN TIME: 2:00 PM EST DATE: 12/29/07

WEATHER EXTREMES SO FAR TODAY:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)............84 Marathon, FL

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F).............89 Key West, FL

........................................... Marathon, FL

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)............-33 Alamosa, CO

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F).............-48 Alamosa, CO

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH)....................54 Anonymous, WY

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)...........1.38 Albany, GA

NATIONAL WEATHER SUMMARY:

In the East, scattered rain showers and thunderstorms continue to affect portions of the Southeast and the Mid-Atlantic region. A few of the stronger thunderstorms produced moderate lightning, gusty winds, and heavy downpours. In fact, 1.38 inches of rain has fallen at Albany, Georgia, and 1.03 inches was reported at Daytona Beach, Florida. Rain and snow showers affected portions of the Northeast through the morning hours. Rainfall amounts of 0.98 inches were reported at Atlantic City, New Jersey, and 0.71 inches of rain fell at New Haven, Connecticut. The rain and snow finally came to an end around the noon time hour, giving way to mostly cloudy skies. The lingering snow showers across portions of the Great Lakes region also came to an end late this morning as well. Otherwise, partly to mostly cloudy skies and dry conditions prevailed.

Across the western two-thirds of the country, an upper-level disturbance produced mostly cloudy skies, rain, and snow across parts of the Pacific Northwest, far northern California, the Great Basin, and the northern Rocky Mountains. Rain fell across the lower elevations of northern California, with around a quarter of an inch reported. Light snow showers affected the rest of the region, with only light accumulations reported. Otherwise, partly to mostly cloudy skies and dry conditions were experienced throughout the Mississippi Valley, the Plains region, the high Plains, the central and southern Rocky Mountains, the Desert Southwest, and central and southern California.

ON THIS DATE IN HISTORY:

In 1830, a very heavy snowstorm ushered in the "winter of the deep snow". This storm produced 30 inches of snow in Peoria, Illinois. Also, 36 inches of snow fell in Kansas City, Missouri. Cold and snow continued into the middle of February and caused great suffering among pioneers.

In 1987, a storm system brought heavy snow to the Appalachians and the Northeast. Snow and high winds created blizzard conditions in southeastern Massachusetts. Thirteen inches of snow fell across portions of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Strong winds produced wind chill readings as cold as minus 60 degrees in southwestern New England. At the same time, a storm system brought heavy snow to the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California. 24 inches of snow fell at Mammoth Mountain, California.

In 1988, a cold front brought rain and snow to much of the Pacific Northwest. 2.70 inches of rain fell in Astoria, Oregon. This was a record for the date. High winds accompanied this front. For example, winds gusted to 81 miles-per-hour in Livingston, Montana.

FRONTS ACROSS THE NATION

An occluded front lies across eastern New York.

A cold front lies across eastern New Jersey, southern Maryland, southeastern Virginia, central North Carolina, and northwestern South Carolina.

A cold front lies from northeastern to southwestern Georgia, and across the Florida Panhandle.

NATIONAL WEATHER FORECAST

Across the eastern two-thirds of the Nation, a storm system will push off the Northeast Coastline. A wintry mix of snow, sleet, and freezing rain will be likely across northern New England through about mid-day. Ice accumulations are expected to be less than a quarter of an inch. Snow accumulations will be up to two inches. This will give way to dry weather for the afternoon, except for far northern Maine, where scattered light snow showers will be possible. Meanwhile, rain showers will push offshore by mid-day across southern New England and the northern Mid-Atlantic. Rainfall totals will be up to 0.20 inches. A cold front will trail south of this storm system, producing scattered showers and isolated thunderstorm across the southern Mid-Atlantic, much of the Southeast, and the Gulf Coast. Brief heavy downpours will be possible in some spots. Further north, light snow showers will be possible across the Great Lakes in the wake of this storm system. Snow accumulations of 1 to three inches will be possible. Locally higher totals of up to six inches will be found across the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Elsewhere, cool and quiet weather will be likely across the Upper Midwest, the Great Plains, and the Ohio and Tennessee Valleys. Highs will climb into the 10s and 20s across the northern Plains; 20s and 30s across the central Plains and the Great Lakes; 30s and 40s across the Northeast, the Ohio Valley, and the Middle Mississippi Valley; 50s and 60s across the Mid-Atlantic, the Tennessee Valley, the Southeast, the Gulf Coast, and Texas; and 70s and 80s across Florida.

In the West, moisture will stream in from the Pacific and bring active weather to a large portion of the region. Scattered rain and mountain snow showers will be likely across the Pacific Northwest, northern California, and western portions of the Great Basin. Snow accumulations will generally be three to six inches, however, locally heavy amounts of 12 inches will be found across the Cascades and the Olympics. Winds will gust in excess of 60 miles-per-hour across the mountains. Further east, scattered snow showers will be found at all elevations across the northern and central Rockies, along with the northern Great Basin. Snow accumulation in the valleys will be a trace to two inches. Locally higher totals of 4 to eight inches will be found across the mountains. Winds will gust in excess of 40 miles-per-hour across favored locations. Elsewhere, dry and cool weather will be likely across California, the Desert Southwest, and the southern Rockies. Highs will climb into the 20s and 30s across the northern and central Rockies, along with the Great Basin; 30s and 40s across the Pacific Northwest, the southern Rockies, and northern California; and 50s and 60s across southern California and the Desert Southwest.

Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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