LINDSAY, Oklahoma - Parents in Lindsay are furious that the middle school didn’t report hit lists targeting students to police or parents. 

The middle school principal says he didn’t consider the threat serious. But the girls accused of making the threats are apparently still doing it. It appears by keeping quiet, the district broke the law.

Parents say they had a right to know when the Lindsay middle school found the hit lists with dozens of students’ names.

“My frustration is with the school. Their lack of taking care of the problem,” said parent Sheila Reed.

The sixth graders who allegedly wrote the lists were suspended, but the school didn’t call police like the law requires.

"Correct,” said Lindsay Police Chief Clint Wood. “With the Senate bill that passed, 1150, went into effect July first of 2018. It states that they shall contact law enforcement. And that’s the mistake they made."

Former Senator AJ Griffin wrote the law. She says, often school teachers and administrators aren’t qualified to determine whether a threat is valid.

"To ensure that someone trained in threat assessment is actually determining the validity of the threat, and of course creating a multi-disciplinary response. So, that the mental health issues that may be part of that behavior are addressed,” said Griffin.

Police are investigating several other threats allegedly made by the girls since they were suspended, including threatening a disabled boy, according to that boy's mother.

One of the girls, a 12-year-old, was arrested Thursday after allegedly making threats at a church Wednesday night. She was released to her mother.

"It definitely indicates that the children haven't learned their lesson. You would think if they did it once, OK, that was a stupid mistake. It won't happen again. The children haven't learned from that yet,” said Chief Wood. "To me, there's an issue. What caused these kids to want to make a list that they want to kill other classmates?"