MOORE, Oklahoma - A Moore baby is hospitalized after contracting E. coli.

The State Health Department confirms they are investigating several cases in children in the Moore area. The department says this is not related to the nationwide romaine lettuce E. coli outbreak but instead, the virus can be traced back to a Moore day care.

Neveah Bell is usually a very a happy and active baby. So earlier this month, it was obvious that something was very wrong. 

“She wouldn’t even lift up her head, she was not eating anything. She wouldn’t play with her toys. She just wanted to be held,” said Melissa Bell, Neveah’s grandmother and guardian.

The day before, Neveah came home sick from day care.

“She had some diarrhea that was pretty violent and had blood,” said Bell.

Neveah was admitted to the hospital.

Doctors eventually confirmed she had E. coli.

The State Health Department says they have identified five cases of E. coli that can be traced back to a Moore day care. But say that's not all that unusual.

“Clusters of cases happen in group settings, especially in child care facilities that are interacting on a daily basis,” explained Laurence Burnsed and Epidemiologist with the Oklahoma Department of Health.

E. coli can be transmitted directly or through contamination of objects that children share. The Health Department says they are working with the day care to stop further spread. Symptoms include diarrhea, bloody stools and cramps and like in Neveah’s case, it can be very serious.

“This is a bacteria that if it gets into your blood stream or effects other organs, it can cause other complications. Some occurrences can result in death,” explained Burnsed.

After two weeks in the hospital, Neveah has fully recovered.  But her grandmother says it was a very scary time.

“You don’t know if it’s going to take a turn for the worse or she’s going to get better,” said Bell.

The Health Department says they had reports of 100 cases of E. coli last year.