OKLAHOMA CITY - Construction should resume this summer on the American Indian Cultural Center in downtown Oklahoma City. Land agreements between the State, City of Oklahoma City, and the Chickasaw tribe wrapped up this week.  

According to those at the museum, now that those land agreements have been signed, the project can start moving forward.

The inside the Cultural Center looks pretty much like it did six years ago when construction came to a halt after the state ran out of money.

Architects are now currently revamping the original plans that includes a larger kitchen and replacing phone booths with charging stations.

The State, City, Tribe, and private donors will pay the final $65-million to finish the project.  Once complete, the City will own the museum and the tribe will operate it. 

The City is also finalizing agreements with a land development company owned by the Chickasaws to develop the land surrounding the museum.

“Being at the crossroads of three different interstates, we really are at the crossroads of American and we expect 160 thousand cars drive by this location every single day,” said James Pepper Henry, Director and CEO of the American Indian Cultural Museum. “So, it’s a great tourist destination.”

Despite the Chickasaw's involvement, the museum will represent all tribes. A grand opening is now set for spring 2021.

“We’re all very excited about that, it’s been a long time coming,” said Pepper Henry. “A 20-year process and a lot of pieces of the puzzle fell into place this week.”

As far as the land surrounding the museum, they are already moving in dirt in but there's no real plans on what they will build.