CLAREMORE, Oklahoma - The debris is everywhere – twisted metal and insulation, and Kevin Cherrington's family memories are scattered for miles.

“It is catastrophic,” Cherrington said. “You never think it's gonna happen to you, but when it does, we just see how much we're loved.

Wednesday’s tornado tore their home apart.

Now Cherrington's family is trying piece it all back together and pick up the mess.

But they're not doing it alone.

“It just instantly broke my heart just driving by it and seeing the destruction,” Chase Worth said.

Worth and several of his friends with Claremore's National Honor Society were out of school Friday, so they woke up extra early to lend a helping hand.

These teenagers don't know the Cherringtons, but that doesn't matter. They're living by the Oklahoma Standard.

“This is just an opportunity to come out and help our community but also to serve our community,” Worth said.

Cherrington said it touched him to see teenagers lending a hand.

“That's responsibility to take that time out of their personal time to help someone they don't know; that's amazing,” he said.

The storm left behind signs of hope in many different places, even after the tornado took part of Cherrington’s roof.

“Every little thing's gonna be all right. And that's what we live by,” he said.