ENID, Oklahoma - Paul Smith said after his son, Weston, suffered unexplained injuries at the group home where he lived in Enid, he installed security cameras, suspecting abuse. 

His suspicions were right. He captured video showing a house manager hitting a special needs client with a notebook, then spraying him with an aerosol can.

The group home is run by a company called Supported Community Lifestyles, the same company that owns the group home where Christopher Leverett who is autistic was hit by an employee last week in Stillwater. 

The employee later admitted to hitting Leverett and was fired.

Smith said firing isn't the answer. 

He believes all group homes should have cameras, and said Supported Community Lifestyles should hire better staff to begin with. 

“They put staff in there that doesn’t know anything” Smith said. “Doesn’t know the clients; their behaviors; how to deal with them or what to do with them."

"We have to hire people in about the seven to nine dollar range.  If we paid more we'd get bankrupt," said Ron Hammock, the owner of Supported Community Lifestyles. 

He insists the company tries to hire only the best people, but, basically, you get what you pay for.

“They don’t know how to handle the client," Smith said. "They’re there for the money and that’s it.”

A spokesman for the Oklahoma Department of Human Services said the state gets very few complaints about group homes. 

He said if you do suspect abuse, you should call DHS at 1 (800) 522-3511.