An Oklahoma lawmaker is pushing to allow chemical castration of sex offenders. The procedure is in effect in two other states and could be in Oklahoma before the end of the year.

This isn't the first time this idea has come up in Oklahoma. It's always been shot down, but some believe it could actually work.

The term sex offender stirs up disgust and maybe even the thought of castration. But it's not so farfetched.

Oklahoma Senator Mark Allen is pushing Senate Bill 671, and it deals with chemical castration of sex offenders.

The bill relates to violent sex offenders and states "A person who has been convicted of a sexually violent offense may, upon a first conviction and in addition to any other punishment provided by law, undergo treatment...as part of conditions of release."

It goes on to state after a second conviction an offender "shall be required" to undergo treatment.

Allen said he's studied the process in other states.

“The inmate has to go through counseling before going through the process,” Allen said. “I think they've had about a 90 percent success rate. If somebody wants an early release from prison they can go through the process.”

Attorney David Slane has represented more than 500 sex offenders, and believes chemical castration could work and has with some of his clients.

"I remember one in particular who told me he went to his doctor voluntarily, used this hormone therapy and as he said 'It cured me. I no longer have the thoughts. I no longer have the sex drive.' For years afterwards he had never reoffended. So to me that was proofs in the pudding. There may be something here,” Slane said.

Both Florida and California require mandatory chemical castration injections for repeat sex offenders.

“Offenders are in jail for a reason, and if there are any options for early release then this could be on of their options,” Allen said.

The bill has a long way to go, but if passed it could go into effect in November of this year.