OKLAHOMA CITY - More than a hundred people gathered outside of the Ralph Ellison Library on Saturday afternoon, as they prepared to march all the way to the Oklahoma Governor's Mansion.

Step by step, those young and old - and from every walk of life - came to show their support for what is being called their 'Journey for Justice.'

“It's not about black and white,” said Anthony Douglas, President of the Oklahoma Chapter of the NAACP. “This is about justice!”

Those who took part wanted to express their discontent by chanting “Hands Up, Don't Shoot” all along the way.

They also held signs that read 'No Justice, No Peace,' 'When Will It Change' and 'Stand Up With Our Children.'

Marches like this one are taking place all over the country, in response to the Michael Brown case in Ferguson, Missouri as well as other cases of alleged police brutality and alleged racial profiling across the state and nation.

“Excessive force by police is an issue that concerns all of us,” said Nathaniel Batchelder, who is with a group called the 'Peace House.'

Many along the protest route showed support for the march by beeping and cheering as the group took over part of 23rd Street.

Ironically, they were protected and led by a police escort.

Clint Wilburn watched the rally from his wheelchair along the sidewalk.

And as he saw it wind its way towards the Governor's Mansion and come to an end at the Oklahoma County Health Department, he had these words of wisdom.

"America is torn, but it's not torn apart," said Wilburn. "It can be fixed."

But Wilburn said it should be fixed with love, not hate.

“We can make it together,” said Wilburn. “An undivided America - we can unite it back together. Hope isn't lost.”

This group also plans to gather outside the Oklahoma State Capitol on Friday Dec. 7.