MUSTANG, Oklahoma - Cassie Lindsey says she went back to Mustang High School Thursday morning, and the administration building to find out why her son was suspended, and why he can't return. And she says she was again given the runaround.

"As a parent as a mother you love your kids," said Lindsey. "You are going to protect them!"

Lindsey says it took two days and several hours to finally get the one thing she was looking for from the school: A written reason as to why her son was suspended.

"It [was for] distribution of a controlled substance which again, they found no controlled substance on him," said Lindsey.

On Wednesday, Lindsey showed News 9 a copy of the drug test her son took and passed. And she says there was no proof he ever had any drugs on him either.

"We've searched his room and found nothing," asserts Lindsey. "Drug test, again negative!"

Mustang Police confirm they "arrested three students" on drug related complaints this week. And that a substance suspected to be a form of "synthetic marijuana was seized" on another student. That substance was sent to the OSBI for testing.

News 9 also wanted to know what district policy was on notifying parents and students about any ongoing investigations, but instead of going on camera, the district issued another written statement.

In it they go on to explain how they are "unable to discuss potential disciplinary action regarding an individual student" with no reference as to why they did not notify parents and students about what happened.

"They could have put it on their website and did the phone call," explains Lindsey.

A spokesperson with mustang schools tells News 9 that they do not discuss individual cases and that they do not feel it is appropriate to discuss this case in a public forum, even though both the administration and police are investigating.

We know the attorney of another parent is filing a formal appeal, claiming her son was strip searched.

The attorney says the boy is being suspended for a year in this case, without any explanation.

A spokesperson with Mustang Public Schools sent News 9 the following statement:

"We are unable to discuss potential disciplinary action regarding an individual student. However, we are able to clarify district policy regarding student conduct and discipline:

When unacceptable student behavior is brought to the attention of the principal, the principal will fully investigate the circumstances. Any allegation involving the use, possession or distribution of illegal substances is taken very seriously. As these substances pose a direct and potentially life-threatening risk to student health and safety, it may become necessary for the school to involve law enforcement. In this event, the law enforcement investigation becomes primary and the district will fully support this investigation.

It may be necessary for the principal to initiate a short-term suspension period of 3-5 days while a full investigation is completed. It is district policy that a parent or guardian will be notified as soon as possible regarding short-term suspension, or other disciplinary action. At the completion of a short-term suspension, additional disciplinary action could be taken.

Based on the outcome of a law enforcement or district investigation, the school principal has the discretion to choose any disciplinary action in regard to unacceptable student behavior. In considering the different forms of discipline, the principal may choose from the following actions." (Disciplinary action is not limited to the items on this list, nor is this list of actions in sequential order):

1. Conference with student

2. Conference with parent

3. In-school Intervention

4. Detention

5. Referral to counselor

6. Behavior contract

7. Temporary removal from class

8. Financial restitution for lost, stolen or damaged property

9. Restriction of privileges

10. Referral to police and/or citations issued

11. Short-term suspension

12. Long-term suspension

13. Other appropriate disciplinary action as required and as indicated by circumstances

"State law and district policy both prohibit the forcible search of students or their property. However, if a reasonable suspicion exists that students are in possession of controlled substances or dangerous weapons, state law does allow school staff to a) ask students if they are in possession of any controlled substances or dangerous weapons, or b) ask students to empty their pockets, backpacks or purses while the student is on any school premises, in transit under the authority of the school, or while attending any function sponsored or authorized by the school."