OKLAHOMA CITY - Sex offenders are being put to the test to avoid jail time as part of a state program making registered offenders take lie detector tests, and they have to do it on their own dime.

Brad Crawford, a convicted sex offender, said he has paid his debt to society and doesn't want to pay an additional $400 a year.

"They said if you are under supervision they could ask every personal things, like if you watch pornography, if you masturbate. If you are not under supervision they still have the right to do the polygraph," Crawford said.

In 1997 Crawford was convicted of lewd molestation.

"There was no touching, no sexual intercourse like that or anything or anything like that. I was at a tanning salon and looked at somebody that was a day shy of 16," he said.   

DOC mailed some offenders a letter which said in part, "Those offenders who have successfully completed verifiable treatments are still responsible for completing polygraph examinations, with or without a court order."

Crawford's attorney, David Slane, is outraged.

"We are not making anything safer and it just doesn't make sense. It said in the letter that it will be done by court order or no court order. It is very confusing. The left hand does not know what the right hand is doing," said Slane.

Despite the letter, a DOC spokesperson said this is nothing new and only applies to those under supervision.  

DOC said the lie detector policy has been in place for a number of years and is part of a model that national experts have identified as a "best practice" in supervising sex offenders.