OKLAHOMA CITY - Gov. Mary Fallin signed Monday an executive order ending the burn ban for 22 counties, including Oklahoma County. The statewide ban, which was enacted August 3, remains in place for 55 other counties.

The governor's office said Fallin removed the ban at the request of Oklahoma Forestry Services, and due to improving fire conditions.

The burn ban has been lifted in the following counties:

Oklahoma, Atoka, Beckham, Choctaw, Cleveland, Coal, Creek, Delaware, Dewey, Hughes, Lincoln, McClain, McCurtain, Okfuskee, Okmulgee, Ottawa, Pittsburg, Pottawatomie, Pushmataha, Roger Mills, Seminole and Tulsa

The governor's office suggested citizens check with the counties before doing any type of burning, to be sure county burn bans have not been enacted. Foresters warn although conditions have improved, wildfires are still a threat.

"Though several counties are not covered by burn bans, conditions are still conducive to sustaining wildland fire," said George Geissler, Oklahoma State Forester. "I ask all Oklahomans to be very cautious with activities that could spark a wildfire such as grilling, campfires or any other outdoor burning."

The governor's burn ban still affects these counties:

Adair, Alfalfa, Beaver, Blaine, Bryan, Caddo, Canadian, Carter, Cherokee, Cimarron, Comanche, Cotton, Craig, Custer, Ellis, Garfield, Garvin, Grady, Grant, Greer, Harmon, Harper, Haskell, Jackson, Jefferson, Johnston, Kay, Kingfisher, Kiowa, Latimer, LeFlore, Logan, Love, McIntosh, Major, Marshall, Mayes, Murray, Muskogee, Noble, Nowata, Osage, Pawnee, Payne, Pontotoc, Rogers, Sequoyah, Stephens, Texas, Tillman, Wagoner, Washington, Washita, Woods and Woodward

Oklahoma Forestry Services asks you to report any suspicious smoke or fire to your nearest fire department immediately.