Oklahoma City - Oklahoma City – Republican Presidential hopeful Rick Santorum rolled into Oklahoma Sunday afternoon as we tried to solidify support from voters in the Sooner State. The former Pennsylvania Senator made his first campaign stop at the steps of the State Capitol.

"We pick Rick! We pick Rick!"

That was the message from the 300 supporters who were attending the rally on the steps of the State Capitol.

"It's important as Americans that we stay united as Americans," said supporter Mitchell Choutau. "Not one group paying the bill, the other group asking to be paid for. So, I think Rick will bring us together."

The most recent poll conducted among likely voters in Oklahoma by the American Research Group showed Santorum with a double-digit lead over Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich.

Among likely voters 37% support Rick Santorum, 26% support Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney and 22% plan to vote for Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich.

Santorum spent the majority of his time courting social conservatives in Oklahoma. He talked about religious freedoms and the importance of religion in politics. He also got the crowd going when he talked about his support for drilling.

"We're going to have a president who understands the word yes," said Santorum. "Yes to opening up drilling offshore. Yes to drilling in deep water, yes to drilling in Federal lands. Yes to the Keystone Pipeline coming down here to Oklahoma. 

A small group of about a dozen protestors briefly interrupted the candidate's speech. They chanted, "Get your hate out of my state." Their protests sparked some heated exchanges with Santorum supporters who screamed back.

Some republicans at the rally said they were not supporting Santorum because of his voting record while in Congress.

"I don't think there's a spending bill that he didn't vote for," said registered republican Lou Greer. "Budget after budget, more spending, more spending. He was not just a foot soldier. He was in leadership there while the past republicans were spending us into the poor house."

He was upset that so many voters hadn't done their research. Greer and his wife were hoping to change some voters' minds about Santorum.

Despite the distractions during the rally, Santorum kept an upbeat attitude, showing confidence that his campaign was in the primary race for the long-haul.

"We will go on past Super Tuesday," said Santorum. "We will go to Alabama and Mississippi and win there and this race will turn around and we will be the nominee."

Santorum is looking to capitalize on Oklahoma's 40 delegates that are up for grabs. In all, 10 states will be in play Tuesday as candidates hope to gain momentum and delegates.